Chia Nan University of Pharmacy & Science Institutional Repository:Item 310902800/30920
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    Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ir.cnu.edu.tw/handle/310902800/30920


    Title: Comparing Self-stigma Between People With Different Mental Disorders in Taiwan
    Authors: Chang, Chih-Cheng
    Wu, Tsung-Hsien
    Chen, Chih-Yin
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    Contributors: Chi Mei Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat
    Kings Coll London, Inst Psychiat Psychol & Neurosci, Hlth Serv & Populat Res Dept
    Chia Nan Univ Pharm & Sci, Coll Recreat & Hlth Management, Dept Senior Citizen Serv Management
    Chi Mei Med Ctr, Dept Psychiat
    Chang Jung Christian Univ, Coll Hlth Sci, KDepartment Nursing
    Hong Kong Polytech Univ, Fac Hlth & Social Sci, Dept Rehabil Sci
    Keywords: Anxiety disorder
    bipolar disorder
    depressive disorder
    schizophrenia
    discrimination
    Date: 2016-07
    Issue Date: 2018-01-18 11:37:57 (UTC+8)
    Publisher: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Abstract: Internalized stigma (or self-stigma), one of the most painful effects of stigma, causes people with mental health problems profound negative consequences, for example, psychological adversity, demoralization, and feelings of hopelessness. However, knowledge about self-stigma in people with different mental disorders is insufficient. We hypothesized that people with different psychiatric diagnoses have different levels of self-stigma. Through convenience sampling, we used the Internalized Stigma of Mental Illness Scale to compare people diagnosed with schizophrenia (n = 161), depressive disorder (n = 98), bipolar disorder (n = 43), and anxiety disorder (n = 45) in southern Taiwan. We found that people with schizophrenia (mean, 2.09-2.30) and those with bipolar disorder (mean, 2.16-2.38) had significantly higher levels of self-stigma, except for the Stigma Resistance, than did those with anxiety disorder (mean, 1.74-1.87). Our results suggest that clinicians should use different interventions to reduce self-stigma for populations with different psychiatric diagnoses.
    Relation: Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, v.204 n.7, pp.547-553
    Appears in Collections:[Dept. of Senior Citizen Management] Periodical Articles

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